Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)
Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)
Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)
Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)
Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)
Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)

Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower (Speakers Corner)

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Antonio Carlos Jobim - piano, electric-piano, vocals, guitar [click here to see all vinyl featuring Antonio Carlos Jobim]

Joe Farrell (ss); Urbie Green (tb); Hubert Laws (fl); Eumir Deodato (g, arr, cond); Harry Lookofsky (v); Ron Carter (b); Airto Moreira, Everaldo Ferreira (perc); João Palma (dr)

Written by Antonio Carlos Jobim (A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3, B4, B5), Ary Barroso (A4), Chico Hollanda (B5)


1 LP, gatefold jacket

Original analog Master tape : YES

Stereo

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : Pallas

Label : Speakers Corner

Original Label :  CTI

Recording: June 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, USA

Production: Creed Taylor

Originally released in 1970

Reissued Feb 2015


Tracks :

Side A :

1. Brazil
2. Stone Flower
3. God And The Devil In The Land Of The Sun
4. Sabia

Side B :

1. Choro
2. Andorinha
3. Amparo
4. Children’s Games
5. Tereza My Love
 



Reviews
:

« Recorded in 1970 at Rudy Van Gelder's studio in New Jersey under the production auspices of Creed Taylor, the arrangement and conducting skills of Deodato, and the engineering expertise of Van Gelder himself, Jobim's Stone Flower is quite simply one of his most quietly stunning works -- and certainly the high point of his time at Columbia. Nearly a decade after the paint peeled from the shine of bossa nova's domination of both the pop and jazz charts in the early '60s, Creed Taylor brought Jobim's tender hush of the bossa sound back into the limelight. With a band that included both Jobim and Deodato on guitars (Jobim also plays piano and sings in a couple of spots), Ron Carter on bass, João Palma on drums, Airto Moreira and Everaldo Ferreira on percussion, Urbie Green on trombone, Joe Farrell on soprano saxophone, and Harry Lookofsky laying down a soulful violin solo on the title track, Jobim created his own version of Kind of Blue. The set opens with the low, simmering "Tereza My Love," with its hushed, elongated trombone lines and shifting acoustic guitars floating on the evening breeze. It begins intimate and ends with a closeness that is almost uncomfortably sensual, even for bossa nova. And then there are the slippery piano melodies Jobim lets roll off his fingers against a backdrop of gauzy strings and syncopated rhythms in both "Choro" and "Brazil." The latter is a samba tune with a sprightly tempo brought to the fore by Jobim's sandy, smoky vocal hovering ghost-like about the instrumental shimmer in the mix. Take, for instance, the title track with its stuttered, near imperceptible percussion laid under a Jobim piano melody of such simplicity, it's harmonically deceptive. It isn't until Lookofsky enters for his solo that you realize just how sophisticated and dense both rhythm and the chromatic lyricism are. The album closes with a reprise of "Brazil," restating a theme that has, surprisingly been touched upon in every track since the original inception, making most of the disc a suite that is a lush, sense-altering mediation, not only on Jobim's music and the portraits it paints, but ON the sounds employed by Taylor to achieve this effect. Stone Flower is simply brilliant, a velvety, late-night snapshot of Jobim at his peak. » AllMusic Review by Thom Jurek

Around the year 1970, almost everything appeared to have been said about the style of music over the past two decades, which was a mix of samba and cool jazz. Adventurous musicians such as Luis Bonfa, Baden Powell, Charly Byrd, João and Astrud Gilberto, and the saxophonist Stan Getz lent fire and sentiment to the “new trend”. First and foremost among them was Carlos Antonio Jobim, whose catchy tunes such as the ticking, shuffling song "Desafinado" and the genial "One Note Samba" were heard all over the globe.

That the man from Ipanema still had a lot to say is proved by the present album, which presents Jobim’s creativity at the height of his maturity. Right from the very first number, where Urbie Green on the trombone 'sings' "Tereza My Love" so purely in the top register, it is clear that the late bossa with its typical rhythm is structurally far more refined than the early hot dance numbers. The melodies are woven through, as it were, with shining gold and silver threads of rhythm, and clusters of sound are light and airy. However, here and there, the musicians let their hair down, such as in the Latin classic "Brazil".

With that magician of sound Deodato as arranger and conductor, and Rudy van Gelder as recording engineer, this LP is certainly a Bossa masterpiece. There’s no more to be said!



Ratings :

Allmusic : 4.2 / 5 , Discogs  4,53 / 5 , Rate Your Music  3,77 / 5

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