Carpenters - Now & Then (200g, Japanese edition)
Carpenters - Now & Then (200g, Japanese edition)
Carpenters - Now & Then (200g, Japanese edition)
Carpenters - Now & Then (200g, Japanese edition)

Carpenters - Now & Then (200g, Japanese edition)

€129,00
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Rarity vinyl cannot be exchanged as they are sole copies of sold-out editions.
If damaged they would be refunded after return but not exchanged.
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Rarity - Sealed

 

Vocals – Karen Carpenter, Richard Carpenter

Backing vocals – The Jimmy Joyce Children's Chorus (A1)

Voice of D.J. – Tony Peluso

Drums – Karen Carpenter

Drums – Hal Blaine (A4)

Keyboards – Richard Carpenter

Baritone Saxophone – Doug Strawn

Bass – Joe Osborn

Flute, Tenor Saxophone – Bob Messenger

Guitar – Gary Sims, Tony Peluso

Oboe, Bass Oboe, English Horn – Earl Dumler

Steel Guitar – Buddy Emmons, Jay Dee Maness

Arranged and orchestrated by Richard Carpenter

Written by Joe Raposo (A1), Leon Russell (A2), Johnny Pearson (A3), Hank Williams (A4), Randy Edelman (A5), John Bettis (B1, B3), Richard Carpenter (B1, B3), Brian Wilson (B2a), Mike Love (B2a), Arthur Kent (B2b), Sylvia Dee (B2b), Ellie Greenwich (B2c), Jeff Barry (B2c), Phil Spector (B2c), Jan Berry (B2d), Roger Christian (B2d), Wilson (B2d), Artie Kornfeld (B2d), Lyn Duddy (B2e), Lee Pockriss (B2e), Benjamin Weisman (B2f), Dorothy Wayne (B2f), Marilynn Garrett (B2f), Bob Hilliard (B2g), Mort Garson (B2g), Carole King (B2h), Gerry Goffin (B2h)

 

1 LP, standard sleeve

Limited edition

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 200g

Record color : black

Speed : 33RPM

Size : 12”

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : unspecified (Japan)

Label : Universal Japan

Original Label : A&M Records

Recorded 1972–1973 at A&M Studio in Hollywood

Recorded by Tom Scott

Engineered by Ray Gerhardt

Produced by Karen Carpenter, Richard Carpenter

Mastered by Bernie Grundman at Bernie Grundman Mastering

Photography by Jim McCrary

Originally released in May 1973

Reissued in August 2007

 

Tracks:

Side A:

  1. Sing
  2. This Masquerade
  3. Heather
  4. Jambalaya (On The Bayou)
  5. I Can't Make Music

Side B:

  1. Yesterday Once More
  2. Medley:
2a. Fun Fun Fun
2b. The End Of The World
2c. Da Doo Ron Ron (When He Walked Me Home)
2d. Deadman's Curve
2e. Johnny Angel
2f. The Night Has A Thousand Eyes
2g. Our Day Will Come / One Fine Day
  1. Yesterday Once More (Reprise)

     

    Reviews :

    “It was with the release of Now & Then that the Carpenters lost any pretense of being even dorky cool. The album jacket was a giveaway, depicting them in a car in front of a suburban home. The problem also laid in the relentlessly cheerful children's chorus on "Sing," which seemed to come out of every public music outlet that spring and summer; the silly version of "Jambalaya" on side one; and the oldies medley on the second side, which at least predated Happy Days going on the air but still botched its job, mixing Karen Carpenter's haunting rendition of "Johnny Angel" and her spirited version of "One Fine Day" (anticipating her white-bread but effective version of "Beechwood 4-5789") with filler like "Fun, Fun, Fun" and "Dead Man's Curve," all interspersed with Tony Peluso doing his best (i.e., worst) imitation of an obnoxious disc jockey. Whatever the reason, from the moment of the release of Now & Then, listeners under 30 buying a Carpenters album would have good reason to go to a neighborhood where no one knew them to make the purchase, and hide it from their friends. The pity is that the medley paled next to its framing song, the wistful "Yesterday Once More," the last really memorable song that the duo introduced, which summed up in four minutes all of the emotions and sensations that the medley took 15 to deliver. And that song was botched in its album edit, which, instead of giving it an ending, made it part of the medley, with an annoying segue into the latter.” AllMusic Review by Bruce Eder

     

    Ratings :

    AllMusic : 2.5 / 5 , Discogs : 4.75 / 5

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