Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)
Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)

Chet Baker Quartet - Chet Baker in Paris, Vol 2 (Mono)

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€35,00
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ORDER LIMITED TO ONE ITEM PER CUSTOMER

Trumpet – Chet Baker [click here to see more vinyl featuring Chet Baker]

Bass – Jimmy Bond

Drums – Bert Dahlander

Piano – Gérard Gustin

 

1 LP, Quality Jackets with Detailed and Faithfull Reproductions of the Original Artwork with a 4-page, black & white photograph insert

Limited to 750 copies

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Mono

Studio

Record Press : Optimal in Germany using the Metal Mothers from Pallas

Label : SAM Records

Original Label : Barclay

Recorded on Monday October 24, 1955 at Studio Pathe Magellan, Paris

Produced by Fred Thomas

Photography by Jean-Pierre Leloir

Released in 1956

Reissued in 2021

 

Tracks:

Side A :

  1. Summertime
  2. You Go To My Head
  3. Tenderly
  4. Lover Man

Side B :

  1. Small Hotel
  2. I'll Remember April
  3. These Foolish Tings
  4. Autumn In New York


Reviews :

"Baker never sounds less than distinguished, his lyricism intact even on the most hard-driving bop... The piano never sounds murky, the brush and cymbal work comes through nicely, the bass has real heft, and the trumpet floats above the other instruments so weightlessly you'd swear it was a voice." Jeff Wilson, The Absolute Sound, April 2013

« This Chet Baker album originally issued by the French Barclay label in 1956 features only one original member of his then quartet: bassist Jimmy Bond. The drummer, a Swede named Nils-Bertil "Bert" Dahlander took the place of the quartet's original drummer Peter Littman who'd returned to America. The group's original saxophonist Lars Gullin discovered pianist Dick Twardzik dead in his room weeks earlier, dead of a heroin overdose. On piano here was an unknown—Gérard Gustin who'd just been signed by label head Eddie Barclay.

Given the new line-up, the session, recorded at Studio Pathe-Magellan in Paris, Monday, October 24, 1955 was all about standards. Baker chose eight, five of which he'd not previously performed, and three he'd done with Gullin and Twardzik but ten days earlier. Imagine his mind-set.

"These Foolish Things" had been in the group's repertoire for some time. "There's a Small Hotel", "Autumn In New York", "Summertime", "You Go To My Head" and "Tenderly" were new. "I'll Remember April" and "Lover Man" were the two he'd performed with Twardzik and Gullin.

The mood is melancholic for obvious reasons but few do that mood better than Baker and this very well-recorded mono set well demonstrates that!

Despite the forlorn mood, given today's frenzied, chaotic world this record is more likely to produce reverie than outright sadness. If your blood pressure hasn't dropped when it's over you really weren't listening all that carefully. Baker was a ballad master and his straight forward takes here are elegant in their linear simplicity.

The record was mastered from the original analog tape and pressed at Pallas. Mr. Thomas' interest in photography brought him to the original photographer Jean-Pierre Leloir who was sort of like the Francis Wolff of Paris, although he captured the jazz scene without regard to record label.

In addition to superb cover art produced using the original negative, Mr. Thomas has accurately reproduced the cover using the original "fold-over" construction and lamination. Also included inside the jacket is another outstanding Baker photo by Leloir superbly reproduced in a fold-over sheet.

The record is costly (I bought my copy, no promos) but well worth the money for the music, the sound and the packaging. Though its musical significant in terms of jazz history is minor, the record does capture a young Chet Baker in his musical prime and the mood enhancing musical textures, startling image dimensionality and overall atmospheric pleasures make this record a treasure that demands repeated listens. » Michael Fremer, Analogplanet

 

Ratings :

Discogs : 4.67 / 5 , The Absolute Sound : Rated 5/5 Music, 4.5/5 , Michael Fremer : Music 8/11, Sound 8/11

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