John Coltrane - Coltrane Plays The Blues (2LP, 45RPM)
John Coltrane - Coltrane Plays The Blues (2LP, 45RPM)
John Coltrane - Coltrane Plays The Blues (2LP, 45RPM)
John Coltrane - Coltrane Plays The Blues (2LP, 45RPM)

John Coltrane - Coltrane Plays The Blues (2LP, 45RPM)

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€89,00
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John Coltrane — soprano saxophone (B1, D1), tenor saxophone (A1, B2-C1, D2) [click here to see more vinyl featuring John Coltrane]

McCoy Tyner — piano except on “Blues to Bechet” and “Blues to You” [click here to see more vinyl featuring McCoy Tyner]

Steve Davis — bass

Elvin Jones — drums

Written by Elvin Jones (A1), John Coltrane (A2-D2)

 

2LP,  Double Gatefold Jackets

Numbered edition limited to 2,500 copies

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 45RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : Gotta Groove

Label : Original Recordings Group (ORG)

Original label : Atlantic

Recorded October 24, 1960 at Atlantic Studios, New York City

Engineered by Tom Dowd

Produced by Nesuhi Ertegun

Remastered by Bernie Grundman at Bernie Grundman Mastering

Originaly released in 1962

Reissued in 2018

 

Tracks:

Side A :

  1. Blues To Elvin

Side B:

  1. Blues To Bechet
  2. Blues To You

Side C:

  1. Mr. Day

Side D:

  1. Mr. Syms
  2. Mr. Knight

 

Reviews :

« Coltrane's sessions for Atlantic in late October 1960 were prolific, yielding the material for My Favorite Things, Coltrane Plays the Blues, and Coltrane's Sound. My Favorite Things was destined to be the most remembered and influential of these, and while Coltrane Plays the Blues is not as renowned or daring in material, it is still a powerful session. As for the phrase "plays the blues" in the title, that's not an indicator that the tunes are conventional blues (they aren't). It's more indicative of a bluesy sensibility, whether he is playing muscular saxophone or, on "Blues to Bechet" and "Mr. Syms," the more unusual sounding (at the time) soprano sax. Elvin Jones, who hadn't been in Coltrane's band long, really busts out on the quicker numbers, such as "Blues to You" and "Mr. Day." » AllMusic Review by Richie Unterberger

 

Ratings :

AllMusic : 4.5 / 5 , Discogs : 4.43 / 5

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