Donny Hathaway - Everything Is Everything
Donny Hathaway - Everything Is Everything
Donny Hathaway - Everything Is Everything
Donny Hathaway - Everything Is Everything

Donny Hathaway - Everything Is Everything

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Donny Hathaway (arr, voc, keyb, b); Johnny Board (ts); Clifford Davis (as); Robert A. Lewis (tp); King Curtis, Phil Upchurch (g, b); Louis Satterfield (b) Ric Powell (perc, dr); Morris Jennings (dr) & The Vashonettes (voc)

Written by Richard Evans (A1), Phil Upchurch (A1), Donny Hathaway (A2, A5, A6, B1, B2), Leroy Hutson (A3, A6, B2), Edward Kennedy (A4), Ray Charles (A3), Johnny Burke (A4), Erroll Garner (A4), Nina Simone (B3), Irvin J Weldon Jr (B3)

 

1 LP, standard sleeve

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : Pallas

Label : Speakers Corner

Original Label : Atco

Recording: September 1969 – April 1970 by Murray Allen and Roger S. Anfinsen

Production: Donny Hathaway and Ric Powell

Originally released in 1970

Reissued in 2019

 

Tracks :

Side A :

  1. Voices Inside (Everything Is Everything)
  2. Je Vous Aime (I Love You)
  3. I Believe To My Soul
  4. Misty
  5. Sugar Lee
  6. Tryin' Times

Side B :

  1. Thank You Master (For My Soul)
  2. The Ghetto
  3. To Be Young, Gifted And Black

 

Reviews :

« Already a respected arranger and pianist who'd contributed to dozens of records (by artists ranging from the Impressions to Carla Thomas to Woody Herman), with this debut LP Donny Hathaway revealed yet another facet of his genius -- his smoky, pleading voice, one of the best to ever grace a soul record. Everything Is Everything sounded like nothing before it, based in smooth uptown soul but boasting a set of excellent, open-ended arrangements gained from Hathaway's background in classical and gospel music. (Before going to Howard University in 1964, his knowledge of popular music was practically non-existent.) After gaining a contract with Atco through King Curtis, Hathaway wrote and recorded during 1969 and 1970 with friends including drummer Ric Powell and guitarist Phil Upchurch, both of whom lent a grooving feel to the album that Hathaway may not have been able to summon on his own (check out Upchurch's unforgettable bassline on the opener, "Voices Inside (Everything Is Everything)"). All of the musical brilliance on display, though, is merely the framework for Hathaway's rich, emotive voice, testifying to the power of love and religion with few, if any, concessions to pop music. Like none other, he gets to the raw, churchy emotion underlying Ray Charles' "I Believe to My Soul" and Nina Simone's "To Be Young, Gifted and Black," the former with a call-and-response horn chart and his own glorious vocal, the latter with his own organ lines. "Thank You Master (For My Soul)" brings the Stax horns onto sanctified ground, while Hathaway praises God and sneaks in an excellent piano solo. Everything Is Everything was one of the first soul records to comment directly on an unstable period; "Tryin' Times" speaks to the importance of peace and community with an earthy groove, while the most familiar track here, a swinging jam known as "The Ghetto," places listeners right in the middle of urban America. Donny Hathaway's debut introduced a brilliant talent into the world of soul, one who promised to take R&B farther than it had been taken since Ray Charles debuted on Atlantic. » AllMusic Review by John Bush

Many a musical career began in the gospel church choirs of the black communities, but that of Donny Hathaway must certainly be one of the most meteoric. Rolling Stone magazine named him the 49th greatest singer (of 100) of all time, though this might sound somewhat abstract. But just the very first few bars of the opening number "Voices Inside" promises a programme in which the instrumental and human voices are on a par. Just listen to the impressively saturate sound and clear phrasing of the wind instruments which range from discreet to brassy.

Spiced with peppery volleys on the clavinet, Hathaway’s soul sound breaks into new ground with harmonically fresh blues ("I Believe To My Soul"), soars passionately upwards ("Misty") and ploughs through a percussive, dry and cheerful confusion in the number entitled "Sugar Lee". Every single arrangement profits to the full from the excellence of the musicians and each number is therefore quite unique.

Softly cushioned, melodious togetherness ("Trying’ Times") seems just as natural as prayer-like gospel song ("Thank You Master For My Soul"), which ventures into the realms of free jazz harmonies to the glory of God. To round off the album we once again hear Hathaway’s voice, smooth and soaring, right up into the top register, in the short number "A Dream" – an apt description of the whole album.

 

Ratings

AllMusic : 4.5 / 5 ,  Discogs : 4,51 / 5  ,   Rate Your Music : 3,71 / 5

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