Eric Dolphy - Far Cry (200g)
Eric Dolphy - Far Cry (200g)
9% off
Eric Dolphy - Far Cry (200g)
Eric Dolphy - Far Cry (200g)

Eric Dolphy - Far Cry (200g)

€59,00
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ORDER LIMITED TO ONE ITEM PER CUSTOMER




 


1 LP, tip-on jackets

Limited edition

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 200g

Record color : black

Speed : 33RPM

Size : 12”

Stereo

Studio

Record Press :  Quality Record Pressings

Label :  Analogue Productions 

Original Label :  Prestige

Recorded December 21, 1960 at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey by Rudy Van Gelder

Remastered by Kevin Gray

Originally released in 1962

Reissued in 2017

 

Tracks :

Side A

  1. Mrs. Parker of K. C. (Bird's Mother)
  2. Ode to Charlie Parker
  3. Far Cry

           

Side B

  1. Miss Ann
  2. Left Alone
  3. Tenderly
  4. It's Magic

 

Reviews : 

"Charlie Parker's influence permeates this 1960 session. Beyond the obvious acknowledgment on song titles ("Mrs. Parker of K.C. ['Bird's Mother']" and "Ode to Charlie Parker"), his restless spirit is utilized as a guiding light for breaking bebop molds. Far Cry finds multi-reedist Eric Dolphy in a transitional phase, relinquishing Parker's governing universal impact and diving into the next controversial phase that critics began calling "anti-jazz." On this date Booker Little's lyrical trumpet and Jackie Byard's confident grasp of multiple piano styles (though both steeped in hard bop) were sympathetic to the burgeoning "avant-garde" approach that Dolphy displays, albeit sparingly, on this session. Far Cry contains the initial performance of Dolphy's future jazz classic "Miss Ann," along with his first recorded solo alto sax performance on "Tenderly," in which Dolphy bridges the gap between the solo saxophone performances of Coleman Hawkins and Anthony Braxton." AllMusic Review by Al Campbell

"On this session Dolphy is joined by two like-minded weirdos in Little and Byard, as well as an able rhythm section in Carter and Haynes... Everything that we’ve come to love about Dolphy is on display here, from the unorthodox instruments to the stuttering, belligerent solos that seem to go from New York to LA by way of Saturn... Like Dolphy, Little was another prodigy who died early in his career; his smoothly wandering lines provide a sharp contrast to Dolphy’s prickly approach. Byard, of course, has an affection for all styles of piano playing and often welds them into the same passage, a technique he would really perfect in the company of Roland Kirk. At the time, this was forward thinking music that even today has a whiff of the avant-garde." - David Rickert, www.allaboutjazz.com, November 2002

 

Rating:

AllMusic 4.5/5  ,  Discogs  4.46 / 5

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