John Lee Hooker - Don't Turn Me From Your Door
John Lee Hooker - Don't Turn Me From Your Door
John Lee Hooker - Don't Turn Me From Your Door
John Lee Hooker - Don't Turn Me From Your Door

John Lee Hooker - Don't Turn Me From Your Door

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John Lee Hooker - guitar, vocal [click here to see more vinyl featuring John Lee Hooker]

Earl Hooker, Eddie Kirkland - guitar

Written by John Lee Hooker (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6), Charles Brown (A6), Eddie Williams (A6), Johnny Moore (A6)

 

1 LP, standard sleeve

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : Pallas

Label : Speakers Corner

Original Label : ATCO

Recording: 1953 in Cincinnati (OH) and July 1961 in Miami (FL)

Production: Henry Stone

Originally released in 1963

Reissued in 2020

 

Tracks :

Side A

  1. Stuttering Blues
  2. Wobbling Baby
  3. You Lost A Good Man
  4. Love My Baby
  5. Misbelieving Baby
  6. Drifting Blues

Side B

  1. Don't Turn Me From Your Door
  2. My Baby Don't Love Me
  3. I Ain't Got Nobody
  4. Real Real Gone
  5. Guitar Lovin' Man
  6. Talk About Your Baby

 

Reviews :

« There are countless compilations of John Lee Hooker material on the market, issued by a variety of labels under assorted different titles, and this one isn't much different, but then you really can't go wrong with this guy -- he always delivered what he was supposed to deliver with no frills and no fuss, generating a kind of endless boogie that, no matter what embellishments producers added in, was always poised between old country blues and its next-generation urban blues counterpart. None of Hooker's signature songs are here, but one still gets a solid sense of him, and truthfully, the only bad Hooker is no Hooker at all. » AllMusic Review by Steve Leggett

« John Lee Hooker is an American institution. Born in Mississippi (either 1912, 1915,1917 or 1920), he is credited with popularizing electrified Delta blues. His distinctive “boogie” style and cigar box-shaped guitar are his trademarks. Hooker transcended the blues scene and became an inspiration (like his fellow blues man Muddy Waters) to future rock and roll stars  He recorded an album with Canned Heat and appeared in the blockbuster 1980 movie,The Blues Brothers. Other rock collaborations are too numerous to list. Songs like “Boom Boom”. “Boogie Chillen, and “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” will live forever. His catalog of material is voluminous on many different labels, with both artistic and commercial (at least by blues record standards) success. John Lee Hooker has been inducted into The Blues Hall Of Fame, as well as The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame.

Speakers Corner Records has released a 180-gram re-mastered vinyl of Don’t Turn Me From Your Door. Originally released on ATCO (Atlantic), the album is a compilation of six tracks, originally recorded in 1953 for DeLuxe Records, and six new tunes. It is scaled down with guitars and vocals, but it is quintessential. Side 1 opens with “Stuttering Blues”. It is simply, low-down Delta blues with some talking and sly charm (…can I get your phone number?…”). Hooker had a stutter (as did B.B. King), but it doesn’t detract from his confidence, as he seduces with the deep baritone. Picking up the pace, “Wobbling Baby” is straight up tempo with a repeat opening verse line (“…she wobblin’ me all the time…”)… So simple, yet so authentic!. A conventional blues theme is getting wronged. “You’ve Lost A Good Man” delivers the admonishment in a relentless deliberate pace. This romantic dichotomy is epitomized in “Love My Baby” as Hooker moans, “…I love my baby, she been evil all the time…”. Here, there is dynamic interplay between voice and guitar. A first of two instrumentals (“Misbelieving Baby”) adopts a near dirge-like feel, with the conventional John Lee menacing resonance. No matter how many times a blues man gets down, a great one will battle back with emotion. “Drifting Blues” utilizes a compelling echo-infused guitar tonality as the singer laments about being “…like a ship out on the sea…”, but pleads for his woman’s return.

As the title cut kicks off Side 2, the trademark boogie shuffle returns with familiar guitar hooks. The eternal connection between hard times and plaintive loneliness is invoked. Hooker reflects on parental desertion and exhorts…”I’m a pilgrim and a stranger…” to the object of his affection. On “My Baby Don’t Love Me, his heart-wrenching angst is colored by hostility and resignation. His guitar (and bold riffs) serve as an additional voice. A second instrumental (“I Ain’t Got Nobody”) showcases Hooker’s patented boogie musical context, surrounded with thumping low-end rhythm guitar and piercing lead accents. It is obvious how his innate “mood setting” has been a major influence on a wide array of musicians. Of course, there is a return to the angst of betrayal (“Real Real Gone”). Hooker muses about his lover starting out with “church and Sunday school”, only to end up “runnin’ around”. Ironically, he threatens to return to his wife. A seamless transition (almost like a Part 2) into “Guitar Lovin’ Man” expounds on his ego-driven persona. The finale is a breezier jam with an upbeat story about his “…long tall woman, built like willow tree…”.

Don’t Turn Me From Your Door is exquisitely distilled blues by one of the masters. » Robbie Gerson, Audiophile Audition, May 4, 2021

John Lee Hooker is not only a mystery but also an interesting man to study. Some, like the author Jacques Demêtre called the musician from Mississippi »the most raw and African of all blues players from a musical point of view«, while the critic Net Hentoff was awestruck by Hooker’s unfiltered power of expression that could scare the pants off a listener taken unawares. The numbers on this LP bear witness to the fact that Hooker’s musical language could stir one’s emotions deeply, even without the meaty 'boom boom'.

Each title is like a raw diamond, which is intentionally uncut and is to be perceived with directness. With a stutter and a slur in his speech, the singer declaims his song over a twangy guitar, which is driven along by the rhythmic meter. A final farewell is taken sluggishly and sullenly in the forthright text of "You Lost A Good Man", and even a song without words ("Misbelieving Baby") ponders a question in a purely instrumental monologue. Apart from a dash of boogie ("Pouring Down Rain") Hooker avoids all manner of sweet sounds and harmonies. He remains austerely raw, mercilessly honest, occasionally unforgiving and denies all thoughts of any kind regarding going 'back to the roots'. This sound IS the root of it all.

 

Ratings :

Allmusic : 4.5 / 5 ,  Discogs  4,28 / 5 , Rate Your Music  3,80 / 5

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