Memphis Slim - USA
Memphis Slim - USA
Memphis Slim - USA
Memphis Slim - USA
Memphis Slim - USA
Memphis Slim - USA

Memphis Slim - USA

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€35,00
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Memphis Slim (vocals & piano), Jazz Gillum (vocals & harmonica), Arbee Stidham (vocals & guitar)

Composed by Peter Chatman except A7 composed by Memphis Slim, and B3 which is a traditionnal song

 

1 LP, standard sleeve

Limited edition

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : Pallas

Label : Pure Pleasure Records

Original Label : Candid

Recorded at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, January 16th 1961

Recording engineer : Bob d’Orleans

Produced by Nat Hentoff

Originally released in 1961

Re-mastered by Graeme Durham at The Exchange

Reissued in 2005

 

Tracks :

Side A :

1. Born With The Blues
2. Just Let Me Be
3. Red Haired Boogie
4. Blue And Disgusted
5. New Key To The Highway
6. I’d Take Her To Chicago
7. Harlem Bound

Side B :

1. El Capitan
2. I Just Landed In Your Town
3. John Henry
4. I Believe I’ll Settle Down
5. Bad Luck And troubles
6. Late Afternoon Blues
7. Memphis Slim, U.S.A.




Reviews
:

For the most part, this is a 1961 session wherein the blues raconteur and pianist Memphis Slim runs through a good chunk of his repertoire, the songs that came to mind that afternoon. As such, it’s relaxed entertainment, rather than a fixed recording for a larger audience. Which is not to say an audience can’t enjoy this music. Slim’s piano playing is dynamically rich, delicate at times, and pounding when necessary. His vocals are strong, too, but just as capable of dropping down to just above a whisper to make a point. They just don’t make records like this anymore, documents of an artist at work without any attempt to be outside the moment.

Quote from Nat Hentoff’s liner notes: “Aside from the usual hyperbole of record liners, I do think that engineer Bob d’Orleans has caught the full sonic impact of Slim more accurately than on any previous recordings by the Chicago-based wanderer. The best description I know of the sound of Memphis Slim is Stanley Dance’s in the British Jazz Journal: “It’s an outdoors voice with a hard strength that suggests inflexibility, but it bends at the right times. It has a sombre gravity, dignity, shyness, and a shade of melancholy. As he sings, he often seems to withdraw into memories, fond and sad, of other days, other places and other faces.”



Ratings
:

AllMusic : 3 / 5

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