Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano
Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano

Stanley Cowell - Musa-Ancestral Streams, Solo Piano

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WE USUALLY SHIP VINYL WITHIN 3 TO 5 WORKING DAYS
But due to high demand we sometines need more time

ORDER LIMITED TO ONE ITEM PER CUSTOMER

Stanley Cowell - piano, Electric Piano, African Thumb Piano

 

1 LP, gatefold sleeve

Limited edition

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : unspecified

Label : Pure Pleasure Records

Original Label : Strata East Records

Engineered & mixed by John Battiloro, Ron Carran

Produced by Viki McLaughlin & Stanley Cowell

Remastered by Ray Staff at Air Mastering, Lyndhurst Hall, London

Originally released in 1974

Reissued in December 2021



Tracks :

Side A:

1 Abscretions
2 Equipoise
3 Prayer For Peace
4 Emil Danenberg (From "Illusion Suite")

Side B:

1 Maimoun (From "Illusion Suite")
2 Travelin' Man
3 Departure No. 1
4 Departure No. 2
5 Sweet Song

         

        Reviews :

        “Solo piano jazz albums are unique to performers. With no additional accompaniment, the pianist is required to explore melodies, while balancing the rhythmic structure. Often, the left hand will emulate a double bass (or in the case of stride, extend the range) to counter the improvisation of chord modulation (including extensions) and harmony. This provides a stylized  translation of an emotional connection to a song or concept. Progressions often include scale variations and arpeggios, block chording and articulation of sharps and flats. All of the great jazz pianists (Bud Powell, Art Tatum, Bill Evans, Chick Corea, Keith Jarrett, Earl “Fatha” Hines, Thelonious Monk, and Cecil Taylor…the list is endless) have utilized solo piano as a vehicle for their musical vision. Another example of this is a lesser-known Strat-East artist Stanley Cowell. Though not as widely known as his contemporaries, Cowell had a significant imprint on the jazz scene as a session player and band leader. He was the co-founder of Strata-East Records. In 1974, Cowell recorded a solo piano album, Musa: Ancestral Streams.

        Pure Pleasure Records has released a 180-gram re-mastered vinyl of this celebrated project. Musa: Ancestral Streams is a vibrant integration of post-bop, spiritual jazz. Side A opens with “Abscretions”. It is an ebullient celebration with a soulful funky vibe. His innate rhythm and deep feeling emanate from the prominent chords and understated right-hand notation. There is a distinct gospel inflection that lends an aspirational resonance. “Equipose” is stunningly lyrical, but steeped in tempo. Cowell’s improvisational licks are very articulate. The mood is enhanced by volume mitigation and high-register notation. Versatility is at the center of this pianist’s repertoire. On “Prayer For Peace” an enhanced time signature and bold attitude illuminate the track.  Cowell’s left hand is steady and propulsive on “Emil Danenberg”. The ability to intermingle gritty context and sweeping runs is uncanny. His phrasing is meticulous and the arrangement leans on jazzier improvisation. There is a hypnotic pulse to the steady undercurrent of tempo.

        Side B continues with another track (“Maimin”) from Illusion Suite. There is a shift to ethereal near-dissonant interpretation. Texture, in the form of swelling chords seem to act as a chorus to the free jazz verse. It is mercurial and rooted in classical music. “Travelin’ Man” begins with touches of melancholic ambiance. Then, a seamless transition into up tempo joyful expression ensues. The jaunty vibe is accessible and moving. Some of the chord modulations are compelling with swirls of accent. It develops a slower interlude at the finish. Switching to electric piano and African thumb, “Departure No. 1” is a groove fest with palpable atmospheric coolness. In contrast, “Departure No.2” is frenetic bop on acoustic piano. A pounding left hand and free-roaming right hand are scintillating. The precision of the playing is wondrous. “Sweet Song” is a noteworthy finale. It has a ballad-like structure, but Cowell’s energetic instrumentalism is captivating.

        Musa: Ancestral Streams is another terrific 180-gram vinyl release from Pure Pleasure Records. The overall stereo mix is excellent with exceptional separation, most notably on the electric piano/African them piano duet. The glossy album packaging is top-notch, with eye-catching design by Carole Byard. Vinyl enthusiasts will appreciate the front-back extended panel.” Robbie Gerson, Audiophile Audition, June 2021

         

        « Musa Ancestral Streams remains a relative oddity in the pantheon of jazz's black consciousness movement - a solo piano set of stunning reach and scope, its adherence to intimacy contrasts sharply with the bold, multi-dimensional sensibilities that signify the vast majority of post-Coltrane excursions into spiritual expression, yet the sheer soulfulness and abandon of Stanley Cowell's performance nevertheless vaults the record into the same physical and metaphysical planes. Cowell's energy and touch are remarkable, as if guided by divine power, and for all the music's structural spaciousness and rhythmic freedom, not a note feels out of place, let alone excessive. Most intriguing is "Travelin' Man", an overdubbed "duet" featuring Cowell on both acoustic and electric piano that underscores his uncommon affinity for space and presence. . » AllMusic Review by Jason Ankeny

         

        Ratings :

        AllMusic : 4 / 5 ; Discogs : 4.51 / 5 ; Audiophile Audition : 4.5 / 5

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