The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me
The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me

The Doobie Brothers - The Captain and Me

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Tom Johnston (g, hca, synth, voc); Patrick Simmons (g, synth, voc); John Hartman (perc, dr, voc); Tiran Porter (b, voc); Michael Hossack (dr, cga, perc)

Written by Tom Johnston (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1, B5, B6), Patrick Simmons (A5, B1, B2, B3), John Hartman (B1), Michael Hossack (B1), Tiran Porter (B1), James Earl Luft (B4)

 

1 LP, standard sleeve

Original analog Master tape : YES

Heavy Press : 180g

Record color : black

Speed : 33 RPM

Size : 12'’

Stereo

Studio

Record Press : Pallas

Label : Speakers Corner

Original Label : Warner

Originally released in 1973

Reissued in 2007

 

Tracks :

Side A : 

  1. Natural Thing
  2. Long Train Runnin'
  3. China Grove
  4. Dark Eyed Cajun Woman
  5. Clear As The Driven Snow

Side B :

  1. Without You
  2. South City Midnight Lady
  3. Evil Woman
  4. Busted Down Around O'Connelly Corners
  5. Ukiah
  6. The Captain and Me
Reviews :

« The Doobie Brothers' third long-player was the charm, their most substantial and consistent album to date, and one that rode the charts for a year. It was also a study in contrasts, Tom Johnston's harder-edged, bolder rocking numbers balanced by Patrick Simmons' more laid-back country-rock ballad style. The leadoff track, Johnston's "Natural Thing," melded the two, opening with interlocking guitars and showcasing the band's exquisite soaring harmonies around a beautiful melody, all wrapped up in a midtempo beat -- the result was somewhere midway between Allman Brothers-style virtuosity and Eagles/Crosby & Nash-type lyricism, which defined this period in the Doobies' history and gave them a well-deserved lock on the top of the charts. Next up was the punchy, catchy "Long Train Runnin'," a piece they'd been playing for years as an instrumental -- a reluctant Johnston was persuaded by producer Ted Templeman to write lyrics to it and record the song, and the resulting track became the group's next hit. The slashing, fast-tempo "China Grove" and "Without You" represented the harder side of the Doobies' sound, and were juxtaposed with Simmons' romantic country-rock ballads "Clear as the Driven Snow," and "South City Midnight Lady." Simmons also showed off his louder side with "Evil Woman," while Johnston showed his more reflective side with "Dark Eyed Cajun Woman," "Ukiah" and "The Captain and Me" -- the latter, a soaring rocker clocking in at nearly five minutes, features radiant guitars and harmonies, soaring ever higher and faster to a triumphant finish. » AllMusic Review by Bruce Eder

The Doobie Brothers weren’t brothers, nor were they called Doobie. The band started life as Pud in 1969 in Chateau Liberté, a club in the mountains of California. The group took on the slang name for marihuana cigarettes (doobie) one year later. The Doobies’ music, however, never sounded like that of befuddled, half-stoned junkies. Heavy metal hard rock was their thing which made their record company Warner target the bikers of the rocker scene. The idea backfired, though, because the band had far more to offer than explosive hard rock.

The album "The Captain And Me" is considered to be the group’s most concentrated and versatile production since it contrasts aggressive, hard numbers with gentle ones full of melodiousness. The very first number, "Natural Thing", shows how winsome vocal folk music and electric guitar riffs can be amalgamated into rock music. Amongst these titles, decidedly angry numbers such as "Without You" and "Evil Woman" became real trailblazers. Now and then, an extensive harp solo or nonchalant licks from the acoustic guitar remind one of the pungent bluegrass style emanating from the South. That even the sweet wailing of the steel guitar ("South City Midnight Lady") finds room for expression seems quite logical in this well-thought-out musical concept.

 

Ratings :

Allmusic : 4.5 / 5  , Discogs  3,89 / 5 , Rate Your Music  3,80 / 5

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